June 5, 2012

Here is a great article entitled “How do you achieve success as an indie artist? Enjoy baking and sell your bread.”

 

Here is another great resource for touring/booking bands:  Indie on the Move.

 

Today in Music History:

  • 1956, Elvis Presley appeared on ABC-TV’s ‘Milton Berle Show’. During the performance, Presley abruptly halted an uptempo rendition of ‘Hound Dog’ with a wave of his arm and launched into a slow, grinding version accentuated with energetic, exaggerated body movements. Presley’s gyrations created a storm of controversy.
  • 1959, Bob Zimmerman graduated from high school in Hibbing, Minnesota. Zimmerman was known as a greaser to classmates in the remote rural community, because of his long sideburns and leather jacket.

  • 1961, Roy Orbison went to No.1 on the US chart with ‘Running Scared’, it made No.9 in the UK. The B-side ‘Love Hurts’ also picked up significant airplay, making Orbison’s recording the first version to be a hit.
  • 1964, The Rolling Stones played their first-ever live date in the US when they appeared at the Swing Auditorium, San Bernardino, California. The Stones were supporting their first album release The Rolling Stones, in North America.
  • 1965, The soundtrack album to ‘The Sound of Music’ started a 10-week run at No.1 on the UK chart. It returned to the top of the charts on no less than 11 other occasions spending over 380 weeks on the chart.
  • 1966, At the Marquee Club, London ‘The Bowie Showboat’, a lunchtime performance from David Bowie, ‘three hours of music and mime’, plus a Top Ten disco. Admission was 3 shillings, ($0.42).

  • 1968, The Jimi Hendrix Experience appeared on the Dusty Springfield TV show ‘It Music Be Dusty’, filmed on ATV, in London, England. Hendrix performed ‘Stone Free’ and ‘Voodoo Chile’ and then played a version of ‘Mockingbird’ with Dusty Springfield.
  • 1971, Grand Funk Railroad smashed the record held by The Beatles when they sold out New York’s Shea Stadium in 72 hours.

  • 1971, Paul McCartney’s second solo album ‘Ram’ started a two-week run at No.1 on the UK chart. Featuring the US No.1 single ‘Uncle Albert / Admiral Halsey’.
  • 1975, During recording sessions for Wish You Were Here at Abbey Road Studios, London, England, Syd Barrett turned up out of the blue as Pink Floyd were listening to playbacks of Shine On You Crazy Diamond — a song that happened to be about Barrett. By that time, the 29-year-old Barrett had shaved off all of his hair (including his eyebrows), become overweight, and his ex-bandmates did not at first recognise him. Barrett eventually left without saying goodbye, and none of the band members ever saw him again.
  • 1976, The Who, The Sensational Alex Harvey Band, Little Feat, Outlaws and Streetwalkers appeared at Celtic Football Club, Glasgow, Scotland. Tickets cost £4 ($7).
  • 1977, Alice Cooper’s boa constrictor, a co-star of his live act suffered a fatal bite from a rat it was being fed for breakfast. Cooper held auditions for a replacement and a snake named ‘Angel’ got the gig.
  • 1979, Blues legend Muddy Waters (aged 64), married Marva Jean Brooks on her 25th birthday.

  • 1983, During a 48-date North American tour U2 played at Red Rocks Amphitheater near Denver. The show was recorded and released as ‘U2 Live At Red Rocks: Under A Blood Red Sky.’
  • 1990, American drummer Jim Hodder drowned in his swimming pool aged 42. He was the original drummer with Steely Dan and also worked with Sammy Hagar and David Soul.

  • 1993, Country singer Conway Twitty died from an abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had the 1958 US & UK No.1 single ‘It’s Only Make Believe’. Until 2000, he held the record for the most Number One singles of any country act, with 45 No.1’s. He lived in Hendersonville, Tennessee, just north of Nashville, where he built a country music entertainment complex called Twitty City.
  • 1997, Ex Small Faces, The Faces and leader of Slim Chance, Ronnie Lane died aged 51 after a 20-year battle with multiple sclerosis. Slim Chance had the 1974 UK No.5 single ‘How Come’

  • 1999, Jazz singer and songwriter Mel Torme died aged 73. Biggest hit was the 1956 UK No. 4 single ‘Mountain Greenery’ and his ‘Christmas Song’ (Chestnuts Roasting On An Open Fire) has been recorded more than 1,700 times.
  • 2002, Dee Dee Ramone (Douglas Glenn Colvin), bass guitarist with The Ramones died at his Hollywood, California apartment of a heroin overdose aged 49. He was the group’s primary songwriter, penning songs such as ‘Rockaway Beach’, ’53rd & 3rd’, and ‘Poison Heart’.
  • 2003, A Grandfather who set up his own pirate radio station in Wakefield, Yorkshire was under investigation by local broadcasting authorities. The man known as Ricky Rock had erected a 32ft transmitter in his garden and had been playing hits by The Beach Boys, Beatles and Elvis Presley. Ricky said he set the station up because ‘talent-less boy bands and dance music’ featured on local stations did not cater to the tastes of his generation.
  • 2005, Oasis went to No.1 on the UK album chart with ‘Don’t Believe The Truth’ the bands sixth UK No.1 album.
  • 2007, Jurors in the murder trial of music producer Phil Spector were shown the bloody revolver that was found at the feet of Lana Clarkson, the actress he was accused of killing at his home in the early hours of February 3rd, 2003. She had accompanied Spector to his Alhambra, California mansion after meeting him at her job as a hostess at the House of Blues just hours earlier.

  • 2007, Sir Paul McCartney released his 21st solo album, ‘Memory Almost Full’ on the new Hear Music Starbucks label. It was later announced that all copies sold through UK Starbucks would not be eligible for the UK charts as the 533 stores were not registered with the Official Chart Company. The album was being played non-stop in more than 10,000 Starbucks outlets across 29 countries.
  • 2008, Ozzy Osbourne accepted undisclosed libel damages and an apology over a UK newspaper claim that he was ill at the Brit Awards. The 59-year-old rocker sued over a story in the Daily Star that alleged he had toppled over twice just before the televised ceremony and that he was moved around the awards in an electric buggy.

  • 2010, Led Zeppelin were officially voted the nation’s favourite band by the BBC’s ‘I’m In A Rock ‘N` Roll Band’, Zeppelin coming ahead of both The Beatles and Queen in a phone-in vote. The show also featured Best Singer, Guitarist, and Drummer live phone-in votes which saw Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and John Bonham all nominated in their categories. John Bonham was crowned top drummer ahead of Dave Grohl and Keith Moon, whilst Jimmy and Robert were runners up to Jimi Hendrix and Freddie Mercury respectively.

 

 

 

 

By North Louisiana Musicians Association